News from around the world

The Life Of A Lion In The Canned Hunting Industry

Source: Animal Shame http://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Shame/225598740853762 A few days after the lion is born it is taken from its mother, this is highly distressing for the cubs and the mother. The mother is taken away and made pregnant again, her sole purpose is to be a breeding machine for the trophy hunting outfitter. She spends her whole life giving birth and having her cubs ripped away from her, and she never gets the chance to be a mother. Once her body is useless and can no longe...

The Life Of A Lion In The Canned Hunting Industry

Source: Animal Shame http://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Shame/225598740853762 A few days after the lion is born it is taken from its mother, this is highly distressing for the cubs and the mother. The mother is taken away and made pregnant again, her sole purpose is to be a breeding machine for the trophy hunting outfitter. She spends her whole life giving birth and having her cubs ripped away from her, and she never gets the chance to be a mother. Once her body is useless and can no longe...

The Lion Bone’s Connected To The … Rhino Horn?

International concern is growing around South African game industry insiders who are dabbling in illicit rhino horn and lion bone trade. With fewer than 4,000 wild tigers left — some estimates place the wild population at a mere 3,200 — a sharp increase in the lion bone trade strongly suggests that lion bones are being substituted for tiger bones in the Chinese medicine market.

The Lion Bone’s Connected To The … Rhino Horn?

International concern is growing around South African game industry insiders who are dabbling in illicit rhino horn and lion bone trade. With fewer than 4,000 wild tigers left — some estimates place the wild population at a mere 3,200 — a sharp increase in the lion bone trade strongly suggests that lion bones are being substituted for tiger bones in the Chinese medicine market.

Quenching A Thirst For Lion Bones

The trade in rhino horn to Asian countries has opened an avenue for the sale of lion carcasses—their bones are being used to replace those of tigers in the making of traditional Eastern wines. Conservationists say the trade, which has taken off since 2009, has added to the pressures that have caused Africa’s lion populations to crash from about 200 000 in the 1970s to less than 20 000 today. In some range states in West and Central Africa, lions have recently been declared extinct. ...